A Cat of Tindalos

A Cat of Tindalos

Thursday, April 20, 2017

APPENDIX N: INSPIRATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL READING

Inspiration for all the fantasy work I have done stems directly from the love my father showed when I was a tad, for he spent many hours telling me stories he made up as he went along, tales of cloaked old men who could grant wishes, of magic rings and enchanted swords, or wicked sorcerers [sic] and dauntless swordsmen.

Then too, countless hundreds of comic books went down, and the long-gone EC ones certainly had their effect. Science fiction, fantasy, and horror movies were a big influence. In fact, all of us tend to get ample helpings of fantasy when we are very young from fairy tales such as those written by the Brothers Grimm and Andrew Lang. This often leads to reading books of mythology, paging through bestiaries, and consultation of compilations of the myths of various lands and peoples.

Upon such a base I built my interest in fantasy, being an avid reader of all science fiction and fantasy literature since 1950.

The following authors were of particular inspiration to me. In some cases I cite specific works, in others, I simply recommend all of their fantasy writing to you. From such sources, as well as any other imaginative writing or screenplay, you will be able to pluck kernels from which will grow the fruits of exciting campaigns. Good reading!

Anderson, Poul: THREE HEARTS AND THREE LIONS; THE HIGH CRUSADE; THE BROKEN SWORD
Bellairs, John: THE FACE IN THE FROST
Brackett, Leigh
Brown, Frederic
Burroughs, Edgar Rice: "Pellucidar" series; Mars series; Venus series
Carter, Lin: "World's End" series
de Camp, L. Sprague: LEST DARKNESS FALL; THE FALLIBLE FIEND; et al
de Camp & Pratt: "Harold Shea" series; THE CARNELIAN CUBE
Derleth, August
Dunsany, Lord
Farmer, P. J.: "The World of the Tiers" series; et al
Fox, Gardner: "Kothar" series; "Kyrik" series; et al
Howard, R. E.: "Conan" series
Lanier, Sterling: HIERO'S JOURNEY
Leiber, Fritz: "Fafhrd & Gray Mouser" series; et al
Lovecraft, H. P.
Merritt, A.: CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al
Moorcock, Michael: STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; "Hawkmoon" series (esp. the first three books)
Norton, Andre
Offutt, Andrew J.: editor of SWORDS AGAINST DARKNESS III
Pratt, Fletcher: BLUE STAR; et al
Saberhagen, Fred: CHANGELING EARTH; et al
St. Clair, Margaret: THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS
Tolkien, J. R. R.: THE HOBBIT; "Ring trilogy"
Vance, Jack: THE EYES OF THE OVERWORLD; THE DYING EARTH; et al
Weinbaum, Stanley
Wellman, Manley Wade
Williamson, Jack
Zelazny, Roger: JACK OF SHADOWS; "Amber" series; et al

The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, R. E. Howard, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, H. P. Lovecraft, and A. Merritt; but all of the above authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.

- E. Gary Gygax, 1979, AD&D Dungeon Masters Guide, p. 224

I've highlighted in black authors I love, particularly Fritz Leiber and J..R.R. Tolkien, the masters in my mind of epic and sword and sorcery. A modern list would certainly include George R.R. Marin's "A Song of Ice and Fire"novels series as essential.I would also add Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea novels, Clark Ashton Smith, Michael Shea and McKillip's Riddlemaster Trilogy.

For films I would include all of Peter Jackson's Middle Earth movies, Milius' Conan the Barbarian, Dragonslayer, The Princess Bride, Stardust, Ladyhawke and HBO's television series Game of Thrones as a start to the "A list".


-Mark Tygart, 2017



Nobel Prize-Winning Economist: We're Headed for Oligarchy

In a recent interview at the Economic Policy Institute, Nobel Prize-Winning economist and MIT professor Robert Solow riffed on the political effects of increasing inequality and concentration of wealth at the very top. "If that kind of concentration of wealth continues, then we get to be more and more an oligarchical country, a country that's run from the top," he said.

Solow's sentiments echo a point he made earlier this week in his review of Thomas Piketty's book in The New Republic. (Solow, it should be noted, is not the only Nobel Prize-winning economist to use the o-word in discussing Piketty's work.) Having examined and explained the trends Piketty identifies, Solow turns his attention to the possible measures that could be taken to ameliorate the inequality, and rejigger the system to favor merit over inheritance. Piketty, Solow says, favors an annual, global progressive tax on wealth, such that the benefits of a growing economy could be more widely felt.

This is a proposal that Solow cheers. But there is one problem: 

Piketty writes as if a tax on wealth might sometime soon have political viability in Europe, where there is already some experience with capital levies. I have no opinion about that. On this side of the Atlantic, there would seem to be no serious prospect of such an outcome. We are politically unable to preserve even an estate tax with real bite. If we could, that would be a reasonable place to start, not to mention a more steeply progressive income tax that did not favor income from capital as the current system does. But the built-in tendency for the top to outpace everyone else will not yield to minor patches. 

And this is, perhaps, the most significant point. Piketty has identified the mechanism by which inequality accelerates over time (Solow calls it, simply, the “rich-get-richer dynamic"). But the consequences of that distribution are not merely economic but political: A concentration of wealth leads to a concentration of power, which in turn protects the concentration of power. That our political system is incapable of tempering Piketty's dynamic is not a bizarre coincidence but a direct result.

"Wouldn’t it be interesting," Solow asks in his TNR review, "if the United States were to become the land of the free, the home of the brave, and the last refuge of increasing inequality at the top (and perhaps also at the bottom)? Would that work for you?"

It's working for some people, anyway.

(Source: The Atlantic)


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Muck Monster: A Monster of the Week Mystery Starter

Sometimes I get two ideas for a concept and later write up the other idea as well.

This is "Lake Monster" 's Big Brother.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9U19iOWhBQXlvSzQ/view?usp=sharing

As with all my mystery starters feedback and war stories greatly appreciated.









Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Atuan Returns

Just a little revision to my most minor of creations, but I ran it again and I think it works better now with the new "labyrinth rules". It is a fun dungeon to use with newbies as you can have the monster eat or drain a minstrel and depart while they are learning the ropes.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9a3U2NjFWR0ptWjg/view?usp=sharing

For those interested this starter was always intended to be the sequel:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9N0UyRWJmbnF2cEE/view?usp=sharing





Sunday, April 16, 2017

Breaker Morant

Breaker Morant

D. L. Kershen comments: "Breaker Morant tells the story of the court-martial of Harry Morant, Peter Handcock, and George Witton in South Africa in 1902. Yet, its overriding theme is war's evil. Breaker Morant is a beautiful anti-war statement—a plea for the end of the intrigues and crimes that war entails."

Although it is generally accepted that Morant and/or others in his regiment were responsible for the deaths of a number of Boer commandos, historical opinion is still divided over the central questions of the case — how many Boers were killed, by whom were they killed, and on whose orders? In his book, Born to Fight, Speed has photos of a number of Canadian Scouts wearing black feathers , a symbol that they would shoot any Boer captured under arms.

In 2012, South African historian Charles Leach published the book The Legend of Breaker Morant is DEAD and BURIED: A South African version of the Bushveldt Carbineers in the Zoutpansberg, May 1901 – April 1902. Based upon extensive research, Leach had complete access to unpublished South African sources and the papers of the Viljoen and Heese families.

Joe West, a British Bushveldt Carbineers researcher, wrote in response: "Charles Leach's impressive research has revealed that the crimes of Morant and his associates were worse than originally thought. In today's day and age Morant and Handcock plus several others would be arraigned before a War Crime Tribunal."

Morant's supporters, on the other hand, argue that he and Handcock were unfairly singled out for punishment even though many other British soldiers were known to have carried out summary executions of Boer prisoners. In their view, the two Australians were made scapegoats by the British, who were intent on concealing the existence of the "take no prisoners" policy against Boer insurgents — a policy which, they claim, had been promulgated by Kitchener himself.

However, Hamish Paterson, a South African military historian and a member of the Military History Society, has pointed out that the Bushveldt Carbineers were a British Imperial unit, not an Australian one: technically, the two "Aussies" were British officers.

 It said that while Morant and the others probably committed some crimes and may well have deserved disciplinary action, there is now persuasive evidence from several sources to show that the Kitchener 'no prisoners' order did indeed exist, that it was widely known among both the British and Australian troops and was carried out by many disparate units. It also asserted that the court-martial was fundamentally flawed in its procedures.

The graves of Morant and Handcock were left unattended for many years, but after the release of Beresford's film it became a popular place of pilgrimage for Australian tourists. In June 1998 the Australian Government spent $1,500 refurbishing the grave site with a new concrete slab. The marble cross which stood over the grave had been vandalised, as had many other gravestones nearby.

The most important primary source, the official records of the court-martial, vanished following the trial and their location remains a mystery. A report on the case from Kitchener to the Australian Governor-General (published in the Australian press on 7 April 1902) quotes Kitchener as saying that "the proceedings have been sent home" [i.e. to England].[this quote needs a citation] Whatever their actual fate, the transcripts have not been seen since the trial and evidently not even the Australian government was granted access to them.


The Australian government felt so strongly about this case that it insisted that none of its troops would be tried by the British military during World War I.

Quotes from the film Breaker Morant (1980):

George Wittow: [after Handcock has admitted to murdering the missionary] Major Thomas has been pleading justifying circumstances and now we're just lying.
Peter Handcock: We're lying? What about THEM? It's no bloody secret. Our graves were dug the day they arrested us at Fort Edwards.
George Wittow: Yeah, but killing a missionary, Peter?
Harry Morant: It's a new kind of war, George. A new war for a new century. I suppose this is the first time the enemy hasn't been in uniform. They're farmers. They come from small villages, and they shoot at from behind walls and from farmhouses. Some of them are women, some of them are children, and some of them... are missionaries, George.

Lt. Col. Denny: [regarding Kitchener's order to shoot any Boers taken prisoner] Do you really believe that Lord Kitchener, a man venerated throughout the world, would be capable of issuing an order of such barbarity?
Major Thomas: I don't know, sir. But I do know that orders that one would consider barbarous have already been issued in this war. Before I was asked to defend these soldiers, I spent some months destroying Boer farmhouses, burning their crops, herding their women and children into stinking refugee camps where thousands of them have already died from disease. Now these orders WERE issued, sir! And soldiers like myself and these men here have had to carry them out however damned reluctantly!

Harry Morant: It really ain't the place nor time to reel off rhyming diction, but yet we'll write a final rhyme while waiting crucifixion. For we bequeath a parting tip of sound advice for such men who come in transport ships to polish off the Dutchman. If you encounter any Boers, you really must not loot 'em, and if you wish to leave these shores, for pity's sake, don't shoot 'em. Let's toss a bumper down our throat before we pass to Heaven, and toast a trim-set petticoat we leave behind in Devon.

Sentry: Do you want the padre?
Harry Morant: No, thank you. I'm a pagan.
Sentry: And you?
Peter Handcock: What's a pagan?
Harry Morant: Well... it's somebody who doesn't believe there's a divine being dispensing justice to mankind.
Peter Handcock: I'm a pagan, too.

Harry Morant: There is an epitaph I'd like: Matthew 10:36. Well, Peter... this is what comes of 'empire building.'
Major Thomas: Matthew 10:36?
Minister: "And a man's foes shall be they of his own household."

(Source: Wikipedia & IMDB)



Thursday, April 13, 2017

Geek Wisdom

You’re no hero.
You’re an adventurer:
a reaver,
a cutpurse,
a heathen-slayer,
a tight-lipped warlock guarding long-dead secrets.
You seek gold and glory,
winning it with sword and spell,
caked in the blood and filth of the weak, the dark, the demons, and the vanquished.
There are treasures to be won deep underneath,
and you shall have them...

-Dungeon Crawl Classics Introduction


Tuesday, April 11, 2017

New Dungeon World Adventure Starter: Gothic

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9bFZQUnJEUXRET3c/view?usp=sharing

I'm back to doing my sub-genre fantasy series of dungeon starters, this time it is a starter that is entitled Gothic.

What can I say? I read Nifft the Lean by Michael Shea and before you know it a City-State of the Vampire Queen and her saltwater crocodile infested marshes of Blackwater had added themselves to my Dungeon World map:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9TThUbWNSNFljejg/view?usp=sharing

Tanith's still looking for the Horn of Dagoth: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9a1g2UEdQcmVSUWM/view?usp=sharing
by the bye

I intend this to be a one night or tournamental adventure starter where the players race to shut down the Mad Alchemist's machine before a lightning powered flesh golem awakens and destroys (or tries to destroy) everyone; my little valentine to Mary Shelley(and James Whale).


Saturday, April 8, 2017

Monster of the Week Mystery Starter: Lake Monster

This is my little tribute to Neil Gaiman's American Gods, which I hope would not be too apparent to hunter fans. As with all my mystery starters feedback and war stories greatly appreciated.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9WFhNWldGSkVycm8/view?usp=sharing


New Mystery Starter for Monster of the Week: Monster Movie

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9VjY2Z2hRTi1YNXc/view?usp=sharing




“Just above the cavern's mouth was a narrow ledge of rock running horizontally, and of a few inches in width. On this natural shelf, reflected in the water, I saw, hanging downwards, a decayed fragment of goat-skin, rotten with age, but which might have been bound round something, long years before. Upon this, as if escaped from its folds, rested a Head.
It was a human head, severed at the neck, but fresh and unfaded as if but newly dead. It bore the features of a woman - of a woman of more perfect loveliness than was ever told of in tale, or sculptured in marble, or painted on canvas. Every feature, every line was of the truest beauty, cast in the noblest mould - the face of a goddess. But upon that perfect countenance was the mark of eternal pain, of deathless agony and suffering past words. The forehead was lined and knit, the death-white lips were tightly pressed in speechless torment; in the wide eyes seemed yet to lurk the flame of an unquenchable fire; while around the fair brows, in place of hair, curled and coiled the stark bodies of venomous serpents, stiff in death, but their loathsome forms still erect, their evil heads yet thrust forward as if to strike.

My heart ceased beating, and the chill of death crept over my limbs, as with eyes starting from their sockets I stared at that awful head, reflected in the pool. For hours it seemed to me I gazed fascinated, as the bird by the eye of the snake that has charmed it. I was as incapable of thought as movement, till suddenly forgotten school-room learning began to cross my brain, and I knew that I looked at the reflection of Medusa, the Gorgon, fairest and foulest of living things, the unclean creature, half woman, half eagle, slain by the hero Perseus, and one glimpse of whose tortured face turned the luckless beholder into stone with the horror of it. ("The Gorgon's Head")”

Friday, April 7, 2017

New Dungeon Starter: Black Pearls & Black Water

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9TThUbWNSNFljejg/view?usp=sharing

“The world is fixed, we say: fish in the sea, birds in the air. But in the mangrove swamps by the Niger, fish climb trees and ogle uneasy naturalists who try unsuccessfully to chase them back to the water. There are things still coming ashore. ” ― Loren Eiseley




Thursday, April 6, 2017

Geek poet

The World Is Too Much with Us

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon,
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. --Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreath├Ęd horn.
- William Wordsworth


Friday, March 31, 2017

Zothique

Clarke Ashton Smith(CAS), along with Robert E. Howard and H.P. Lovecraft, was one of the founders of american pulp fantasy. He had a profound influence on the development of the fantasy genre and, while Gygax himself was not much affected by CAS, Tom Moldvay wrote the classic Castle Amber as an homage to Smith (much as The Lost City was an homage to Howard). Likewise, Jack Vance might be called his modern heir.

While my favorite writer in this group remains Fritz Leiber, I am fond of CAS, particularly his short stories. I have always felt his material is as inspiring for Sword & Sorcery as for Call of Cthulhu RPG horror. Xenopus in the J.E. Holmes "Blue Box" Sample Dungeon was inspired by CAS stories and that was my very first RPG adventure. I've been thinking of doing a CAS inspired Dungeon Starter for some time and while researching the idea came across the superb Eldritch Dark website (http://www.eldritchdark.com/) which had this little rpg gem (http://www.eldritchdark.com/files/articles/criticism/zothique-d20v1.pdf) posted on the site. It is is a d20 supplement describing the CAS Dying World of Zothique, simple to convert to Dungeon World. 

Christmas morning!



Dying Earth Dungeon World Sources

GMs who like my Dying Earth Dungeon Starter: 
(https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9OUdDYnBKck9fWG8/view?usp=sharing) might be interested in the Vancomancer, a "Dying Earth" style wizard playbook for Dungeon World. (http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/125796/The-Vancomancer-A-Dungeon-World-Playbook?filters=0_2130_44819_0_0 )

DCC's The 998th Conclave of Wizards (http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/169644/Dungeon-Crawl-Classics-88-The-998th-Conclave-of-Wizards) seems very Vance inspired to me.

Pelgrane Press has a RPG full RPG devoted to this world with multiple supplements although the line seems currently inactive. (http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/11946/The-Dying-Earth-RPG?term=dying+earth&test_epoch=0&it=1)



If Life was like Dungeon World (or Monster-of-the-Week)


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Dying Earth

This starter was inspired by the Dying Earth stories of Jack Vance, who was a Gygax favorite and inspired D&D's "Vancian magic system". The evil lich "Venca" was a tribute to Vance.

The stories Jack Vance's of the Dying Earth series are set in the distant future, at a point when the sun is almost exhausted and magic has reasserted itself as a dominant force. The Moon has disappeared and the Sun is in danger of burning out at any time, often flickering as if about to go out, before shining again. The various civilizations of Earth have collapsed for the most part into decadence and its inhabitants overcome with a fatalistic outlook. The Earth is mostly barren and cold, and has become infested with various predatory monsters (possibly created by magicians in a former age).



Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Ioun Stones

Ioun Stones

The Ioun Stones comes from Jack Vance's Dying Earth series, which is where the "fire and forget" spell casting of D&D came from too, as well as some of the spells such as prismatic spray. The stones are harvested from the core of neutron stars that are being sliced away by the Nothing at the edge of the universe and are therefore rare and difficult to obtain. Their origin is dealt with in the Dying Earth collection Rhialto the Marvelous.

They were introduced in Issue #1 of Strategic Review (no author given, although there is a reference to Vance approving the design/inclusion and he and Gygax corresponded) and first made their way into the rulebooks with the original DMG.

These crystalline stones always float in the air and must be within 3 feet of their owner to be of any use. When a character first acquires a stone, she must hold it and then release it, whereupon it takes up a circling orbit 1d3 feet from her head. Thereafter, a stone must be grasped or netted to separate it from its owner. The owner may voluntarily seize and stow a stone (to keep it safe while she is sleeping, for example), but she loses the benefits of the stone during that time.

Ioun stones have 1 hit point, and an Armor of 5. The powers of each stone vary depending on its color and shape.

Example stones include:
Amber stone: adds 2 to armor class
Crimson spindle: grants user Infravision
Mirror pyramid: immune to petrification
Yellow sphere: sheds light (as per the rote)
Green star: immunity to poison
Green disc: you require no food, water or air
Red cube: immune to normal fire damage
Blue triangle: immune to charm and sleep spells
Dark blue rhomboid: you can never be surprised
Pale orange ellipsoid: feather fall (no damage from falling)



Monday, March 27, 2017

New Dungeon World Starter: Epic Fantasy

This is the third of my "subgenre starters" for Dungeon World. I'm sick, my mom's sick and I find writing these comforting I guess. Really inspired by the Swordbreaker fanzine; its my two cents that Dungeon World can handle a good many of the subgenres of fantasy.

“We have not even to risk the adventure alone, for the heroes of all time have gone before us — the labyrinth is thoroughly known. We have only to follow the thread of the hero path, and where we had thought to find an abomination, we shall find a god; where we had thought to slay another, we shall slay ourselves; where we had thought to travel outward, we shall come to the center of our own existence. And where we had thought to be alone, we shall be with all the world.”  –Joseph Campbell

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9c05lLVdCcURZT3c/view?usp=sharing


Saturday, March 25, 2017

New Dungeon World Starter: Lovecraftian

I had to give my Gibbering Ooze a good new home...

"We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far."

-H. P. Lovecraft

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9elhJcnlnSmtPR2c/view?usp=sharing



Thursday, March 23, 2017

New Monster

Gibbering Ooze
Solitary, Terrifying, Amorphous
Countless jaws (d10+2 damage 1 piercing)
15 HP
1 armor
Ignores Armor
Special Qualities: Gibbering causes -1 on all rolls, Immune to normal weapons, Vulnerable to fire. Will retreat to heal if damaged by ordinary means and drops to zero HP. Fire damage to zero HP will destroy it forever, If gibbering is somehow deciphered message usually useful.(Example: “Only fire will end me; please send me.”)

A Gibbering Ooze is a horrible hybrid of a Black Pudding, Shoggoth and Gibbering Mouther. It resembles a writhing mass of ooze covered with dozens of randomly placed eyes and gibbering mouths, of different sizes and shapes. 

Instinct: Consume

Custom Move:
When you first see the putrescent mutant mass of flesh, roll+WIS. On a 10+ your mind overcomes the horror in front of you and you may act normally. On a 7-9 choose one:
- You flee from the creature.
- You stand transfixed by its horror.
- You run crazed towards it, weapon swinging indiscriminately.


On a fail choose one of the above and lose one point of Wisdom.





"Remembering Leonard Nimoy” Documentary

"Remembering Leonard Nimoy” Documentary to Premiere at Newport Beach Film Festival 2017

LOS ANGELES – March 17, 2017
Leonard Nimoy, a prolific actor/director, best known for playing Spock in the Star Trek franchise will be remembered in this new documentary produced and directed by his daughter Julie and son-in-law, David Knight.
“The Newport Beach Film Festival is extremely proud to host the world premiere of “Remembering Leonard Nimoy”. It is a powerful and intensely personal journey through the life of the legendary actor, director and artist.” Gregg Schwenk, CEO Newport Beach Film Festival.
“My husband, David, and I are thrilled that Newport Beach Film Festival has selected our documentary “Remembering Leonard Nimoy” to be screened at their film festival starting April 20-27 says Executive Producer, Julie Nimoy”.
“Remembering Leonard Nimoy” is an intimate journey into Leonard Nimoy’s personal life. Featuring stories from his childhood growing up in Boston, his early career in Hollywood, his breakout role on the Star Trek series, highlights from his remarkable career, special moments and memories shared by his family, to the remaining years of his life battling chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (COPD)
“Remembering Leonard Nimoy” features interviews with Leonard’s family which includes: his children Julie and Adam, his wife Susan, his step-son Aaron and his six grandchildren sharing poignant stories and special memories. This memorable documentary also includes never-seen-before videos and photos.
For film lovers and Leonard Nimoy fans, tickets for “Remembering Leonard Nimoy” will go on sale April 1st atnewportbeachfilmfest.com/.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Goodbye Goblin Gully

I have posted several Dungeon World conversions of Dyson Logos' popular Goblin Gully adventure in the past. I emailed him and asked permission to do so. However, I have noticed his position on his site has changed.

To quote:

"Just to be clear about these adventures – they are the Copyright of Dyson Logos.
While I encourage you to take my maps and use them for your non-commercial uses including posting them to your blogs, my adventures are 100% under my copyright. So if you want to modify or reformat one of my adventures for your own use, that’s totally cool, but they cannot be republished in this edited / reformatted format.

In other words: If you want a version of one of my adventures in PocketMod format, or re-statted for use with GURPS Magic or another system, go ahead and do it but do NOT post it to the internet, to your blog, or wherever else.

If you have a book where my adventures have material released under the terms of the OGL, you will note that the adventure title remains Product Identity, as do the maps. So if you want to use the OGL to republish my adventures, then be sure to include a new map and title.
Just to be clear about these adventures – they are the Copyright of Dyson Logos.

While I encourage you to take my maps and use them for your non-commercial uses including posting them to your blogs, my adventures are 100% under my copyright. So if you want to modify or reformat one of my adventures for your own use, that’s totally cool, but they cannot be republished in this edited / reformatted format.

In other words: If you want a version of one of my adventures in PocketMod format, or re-statted for use with GURPS Magic or another system, go ahead and do it but do NOT post it to the internet, to your blog, or wherever else.

If you have a book where my adventures have material released under the terms of the OGL, you will note that the adventure title remains Product Identity, as do the maps. So if you want to use the OGL to republish my adventures, then be sure to include a new map and title."

Therefore I am deleting all copies of my adaptions of Goblin Gully from my blog, the Tavern, etc. If you have a copy feel free to use privately but PLEASE do not post on the internet. Thanks.

Monday, March 20, 2017

The Hollow Fingers

Logan Howard strikes again! And this is more of an Empire Strike Back than the traditional sophomore slump! So go download this "precious" before the Centipede God devours you and then your party....maybe not in that order......Did I mention it's Pay What You Want? I can hear many legs a stomping! Go!

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/207706/Sword-Breaker-Issue-No-2--The-Hollow-Fingers?src=newest&filters=0_0_44825_0_0



Friday, March 17, 2017

The Tyrant Machine

Check out Logan Howard's new free Dungeon World zine, he's obviously a blazing new talent (he listed me as an inspiration, wise soul). Seriously, it is a wonderful bit of Dungeon World goodness, PWYW and what are you waiting for?

https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/206544/Sword-Breaker-Issue-No-1--The-Tyrant-Machine



Thursday, March 16, 2017

Under the Dark of the New Moon

Fans of my current S&S Adventure Starter (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9a1g2UEdQcmVSUWM/view?usp=sharing) might want to combine it with Jeremy's gem here (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0lFq3ECDQDQeTkxMjd5WnVxMWc/view?usp=sharing)for some extra Robert E. Howard action for your own improved version of Conan the Destroyer with some additional screenplay adds by way of Lankmar. Also the humans only playbooks might be a good add: (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9dUd3dkM0SERhQTA/view?usp=sharing)

Happy Adventuring!




Wednesday, March 15, 2017

New Dungeon World Starter: Sword & Sorcery Adventure

"Fire and wind come from the sky, from the gods of the sky. But Crom is your god. Crom, and he lives in the Earth. Once, giants lived in the Earth, Conan. And in the darkness of chaos, they fooled Crom, and they took from him the enigma of steel. Crom was angered; and the earth shook. And fire and wind struck down these giants - and they threw their bodies into the waters, but in their rage, the gods forgot the secret of steel and left it on the battlefield. And we who found it - are just men. Not gods. Not giants. Just men. The secret of steel has always carried with it a mystery... You must learn its riddle, Conan. You must learn its discipline. For no one—no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts... This you can trust..."
— Conan's father, touting The Riddle of Steel





Sunday, March 12, 2017

DM Secrets

"The secret we should never let the gamemasters know is that they don't need any rules." -Gary Gygax








Friday, March 10, 2017

Dungeon World: Temple of the Shark Dungeon Starter

First Apes, now sharks on the brain. Actually it was a map posted on the internet that inspired this starter, it made me think of Fritz Leiber's wonderful story "The Sunken land" and J.E. Holmes charming fan novel "Maze of Peril". When I'm trapped in a difficult eldercare struggle, this is what keeps me sane...

At least till Cthulhu calls...

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9RXRZZHBMQ2RIeGc/view?usp=sharing


Monday, March 6, 2017

New Dungeon Starter: Island of the Apes


With the new Kong and Planet of the Apes films coming out this year, I've gotten apes dancing through my brain. They've joined the pirates who are always there...

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7cav44145d9bWRSd2o1eG1rTXM/view?usp=sharing


Sunday, March 5, 2017

Underworlds

The referee must take care not to people (or perhaps “creature”?) his Underworlds with beings so
powerful that no player can emerge alive! The objective is an interesting adventure, with enough
danger for excitement (and also to punish the unwary and the foolhardy), but not simply to massacre
the players….Any campaign can be made much more enjoyable by the construction of a rough
“scenario” into which players can fit themselves. Countries, parties, temple factions, nonhuman
races, etc., etc., all will have objectives of some sort, and the referee should sketch these in….Thus,
players will encounter members of different factions within the Imperium, various foreign agents
with schemes of their own, individuals with a variety of plans and goals, nonhumans, and other
beings. These can be further detailed in play if need be…
- M.A.R. Barker, Empire of the Petal Throne



Tuesday, February 28, 2017

the marvelous journey...

Of all fictions, the marvelous journey is
the one formula that is never exhausted.

                       – Northrop Frye, Anatomy of Criticism


Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Jason should also take a bow!

Jason Lutes
OWNER

Discussion8:56 AM
 
+Marshall Miller just brought to my attention the fact that L&B's 20 Dungeon Starters, by Mr. Miller and +Mark Tygart, has been nominated for best RPG supplement over at BoardGameGeek. How do you like that!

https://boardgamegeek.com/geekawards/rpg

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Have you seen the Yellow Sign?


Planet of the Apes

"However, in 1968 came the yardstick against which all other ape-related movies would be measured . . . Planet of the Apes."

"My only niggle is the stereotyping of the apes species. The gorillas as warlike brutes, the duplicitous politician orangs and cute humanist chimps. Anthropological research has shown these analogies couldn’t be further from the truth. The gorilla is a contemplative vegetarian, with a more passive nature than its bulk implies. The orang (my favorite I must say) is so laid back as to be almost horizontal, a cross between a Zen Buddhist and a chilled out, Californian surf dude. I agree with Terry Pratchett’s observation (no stranger to orangs in his Discworld novels) that orangs’ bare a remarkable resemblance to a startled coconut. Ironically, the chimps do have a similarity to humans in that they are cunning and violent and not above using tools to get their way. I recall watching a documentary where a troop of chimps systematically hunted down a small monkey. They then tore it apart and ate it while it was still alive. Talk about nature being red in tooth and claw!"

-Ian Edginton on the 1968 classic film Planet of the Apes (Terra Primate tabletop RPG introduction)